Internet Architecture Board

RFC2850

History

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A Brief History of the

Internet Advisory / Activities / Architecture Board

The origin of today’s IAB lies in the Internet Configuration Control Board (ICCB), which was created in 1979 by Vint Cerf, at that time program manager at DARPA, to advise him on technical issues. The ICCB was chaired by David Clark, MIT.

In September 1984, after the ICCB meeting held at RSRE in Malvern, UK, the ICCB was disbanded and replaced by the Internet Advisory Board (IAB). This change was initiated by Dave Clark and Barry Leiner, who had taken over management of the Internet research program at DARPA. The IAB consisted of the chairs of the newly-formed research task forces and Jon Postel (ISI), as RFC editor and “protocol czar”. The first set of chairs of the task forces were the members of the ICCB. The IAB was chaired by Dave Clark.

In 1984, there were 10 Research Task Forces [Braden 1998]:

Task force Chair
Gateway Algorithms Dave Mills, Linkabit
New End-to-End Service Bob Braden, UCLA
Applications Arch. and Requirements Bob Thomas, BBN
Privacy Steve Kent, BBN
Security Ray McFarland, DoD
Interoperability Rob Cole, UCL
Robustness and Survivability Jim Mathis, SRI
Autonomous Systems Dave Clark, MIT
Tactical Internetting Dave Hartman, MITRE
Testing and Evaluation Ed Cain, DCEC

In 1986 Dennis Perry, the program manager at DARPA, decided that DARPA should divide its efforts into the areas of Internet-related activities and distributed systems. The Internet area was to be coordinated through the Internet Activities Board, and the effort in distributed systems was coordinated through the “Distributed System Architecture Board” (DSAB), chaired by Doug Comer. Both the DSAB and the IAB used an organizational model where each member chaired a task force. [Comer 2002].

In May 1986, the IAB become the Internet Activities Board (RFC 985).

NSF also elected to support DARPA’s existing Internet organizational infrastructure, hierarchically arranged under the (then) Internet Activities Board (IAB). The public declaration of this choice was the joint authorship by the IAB’s Internet Engineering and Architecture Task Forces and by NSF’s Network Technical Advisory Group of RFC 985[May 1986] (Requirements for Internet Gateways), which formally ensured interoperability of DARPA’s and NSF’s pieces of the Internet.[A Brief History of the Internet]

During August 25-27, 1986, the IAB held the first TCP/IP Vendors Workshop in Monterey, California, in cooperation with DARPA. This event later became Interop.

Later, the Privacy task force became Privacy and Security, while Gateway Algorithms became GADS (Gateway Algorithms and Data Structures), which in turn was split into Internet Architecture (INARCH) and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). The first IETF meeting took place in 1986, with Mike Corrigan (Defense Data Network (DDN)) as the first IETF chair, followed by Phill Gross starting at the fourth meeting. (Working groups were formed in the 5th meeting in 1987; working groups were divided into areas starting at the 15th meeting in 1989.)

The first IETF meeting started out as GADS and ended as INENG/INARCH when Mike Corrigan arrived from the IAB meeting. Mike Corrigan moved to OSD (Office of Secretary of Defense) on October 1, 1986 (the beginning of the fiscal year) and Phill Gross took over at that point. INENG was intended to be a group of operators and its early make up revolved around DOD, NASA, DOE and NSF and their contractors and researchers. Phill Gross was at Mitre under contract to DDN (working for the DDN technical director, Mike Corrigan, then others) when he became chair.

In January 1989, there were the following task forces:

Task force Chair
Internet Engineering Phill Gross, CNRI
Internet Architecture Dave Mills, UDel
Autonomous Networks Deborah Estrin, USC
New End-to-End Services Bob Braden, UCLA
User Interface Keith Lantz, Olivetti Research
Privacy and Security Steve Kent, BBN
Scientific Requirements Barry Leiner, RIACS

The IAB and the task forces were supported by an inter-agency committee of the US government, the FRICC, later to be come the FNC (Federal Networking Comittee).

The next reorganization was planned in Annapolis, Maryland in the summer of 1989. DARPA and the Internet were changing, and the DSAB and IAB were reorganized. Applications and distributed computing were folded into the IAB charter. [Comer 2002] The Annapolis meeting also established the IESG and IRSG, both appointed by the IAB. Some of the task forces became working groups, others research groups in the IRSG. [Braden 1998]

The 14th IETF meeting was held at Stanford University in July 1989. It marked a major change in the structure of the IETF universe. The IAB (then Internet Activities Board, now Internet Architecture Board), which until that time oversaw many “task forces,” changed its structure to leave only two: the IETF and the IRTF. The IRTF was tasked to consider long-term research problems in the Internet and a number of Task Forces were restructured as IRTF research groups. For example, the End-to-End Task Force became the IRTF’s End-to-End Research Group (E2E) and the Privacy & Security Task Force became the IRTF’s Privacy & Security Research Group (PSRG). The IETF also changed at that time. [RFC 3160]

After the Internet Society (ISOC) was formed in January, 1992, the IAB proposed to ISOC that the IAB’s activities should take place under the auspices of the Internet Society. During INET 1992 in Kobe, Japan [June], the ISOC trustees approved a new charter for the IAB to reflect the proposed relationship.” [RFC 3160]

As part of that reorganization, the Internet Activities Board was re-organized and re-named the Internet Architecture Board. The IESG and IETF assumed a larger and independent role in approving Internet standards.

During the last half of 1992, the relationship between the IAB and the IETF came under scrutiny through the first POISED Working Group which reallocated responsibilities for standards decision making and established the framework around which the current practices for populating IAB and IETF are conducted. The POISED Working Group presented its conclusions and recommendations to the Internet Society Board of Trustees in December 1992 and these were accepted as the working basis for the relationships among IAB, IESG, ISOC and IETF participants. Subsequently, RFC 1310 was prepared by the IETF in an attempt to codify these working principles [ RFC 2026 is the current version of this document, with further updates in RFC 3667RFC 3668 and RFC 3932]. [ IETF and ISOC]

 


IAB Members

Unless otherwise noted, the terms of IAB members began in March or April of the year listed and ended in March or April of the year listed. The names below are listed by starting year. It is likely that several members from the early years of the IAB are missing. Uncertain dates are marked by ‘?’.

Member Organization (at time of service) From To
Dave Clark MIT 1983 ?
Vint Cerf Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI) 1983 1993
Stephen Kent BBN 1983 1995
Bob Braden UCLA 1981 1994
Dave Mills Linkabit 1984? ?
Bob Thomas BBN 1984? ?
Ray McFarland U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) 1984? ?
Rob Cole UCL 1984? ?
Jim Mathis SRI 1984? 1988
Dave Hartman Mitre 1984? ?
Ed Cain Defense Communications Engineering Center (DCEC) (part of DCA) 1984? ?
Doug Comer Purdue University 1986 1989
Lyman Chapin Data General, BBN 1989 1993
Hans-Werner Braun Merit,
San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC)
1990? 1994
Anthony Lauck DEC 1990 1994
Barry Leiner RIACS, Advanced Decision Systems (ADS), University Space Research Association (USRA) 1990? 1994
Keith Lantz Olivetti Research 1989 ?
Deborah Estrin USC 1989 ?
Dan Lynch Interop 1990? 1994
Jon Postel USC Information Sciences Institute (ISI) 1990? 1993
Elise Gerich Merit 1993 1997
Jun Murai WIDE 1993 1995
Yakov Rekhter IBM Research 1993 1997
John Romkey ELF Communications 1993 1995
Dave Sincoskie Bellcore 1993 1995
Mike St Johns ARPA 1993 1995
Network Associates
Nominum
2002 2004
Phill Gross NRI 1994 1996
Christian Huitema INRIA 1991 1996
Robert Elz University of Melbourne 1994 1998
Brian Carpenter IBM 1994 2002
Lixia Zhang Xerox PARC 1994 1996
UCLA 2005 2009
Steve Crocker USC 1994 1996
J. Allard Microsoft 1995 1997
Robert Moskowitz Chrysler 1995 1999
Erik Huizer SURFnet 1995 1999
Chris Weider Microsoft 1995 1997
Steve Bellovin AT&T 1996 2002
Jon Crowcroft UCL,
Cambridge
1996 2002
John Klensin MCI,
MCI Worldcom,
AT&T
1996 2002
(Independent) 2009 2011
Radia Perlman Sun Microsystems 1996 1998
Steve Deering Cisco 1997 2002
Tony Hain Microsoft 1997 2001
Cyndi Jung 3Com 1997 1999
Charlie Perkins Sun 1997 1999
Ned Freed Innosoft 1998 2000
Tim Howes Netscape 1998 2000
Harald Alvestrand Cisco 1999 2001
Ran Atkinson Extreme Networks 1999 2003
Rob Austein Integrated Systems, Internetshare, Grunchweather Associates,
Internet Systems Consortium
1999 2005
Geoff Huston Telstra,
APNIC
1999 2005
Henning Schulzrinne Columbia University 2000 2002
Leslie Daigle ThinkingCat Enterprises,
Verisign,
Cisco,
Internet Society
2000 2008
Fred Baker Cisco 2001 2003
Sally Floyd ACIRI,
ICIR
2001 2005
Ted Hardie Nominum,
Qualcomm
2002 2003
Charlie Kaufman IBM,
Microsoft
2002 2004
James Kempf NTT 2002 2004
Eric Rescorla RTFM 2002 2008
Bernard Aboba Microsoft 2003 2007
Jun-ichiro Itojun Hagino IIJ 2003 2005
Mark Handley ICIR,
UCL
2003 2005
Patrik Fältström Cisco 2003 2006
Bob Hinden Nokia 2004 2006
Pete Resnick Qualcomm 2004 2006
Jonathan Rosenberg dynamicsoft,
Cisco
2004 2006
Loa Andersson Acreo 2005 2009
Kurtis Lindqvist Netnod 2005 2009
David Meyer Cisco / University of Oregon 2005 2007
Pekka Nikander Ericsson / Helsinki University of Technology 2005 2006
David Oran Cisco 2006 2010
Olaf Kolkman NLnet Labs 2006 2012
Kevin Fall Intel 2006 2008
Elwyn Davies Folly Consulting 2006 2008
Dave Thaler Microsoft 2006 present (*)
Barry Leiba IBM 2007 2009
Danny McPherson Arbor Networks 2007 2013
Gonzalo Camarillo Ericsson 2008 2010
Stuart Cheshire Apple 2008 2010
Gregory Lebovitz Juniper 2008 2010
Andrew Malis Verizon 2008 2010
Marcelo Bagnulo University Carlos III of Madrid 2009 2011
Vijay Gill Google 2009 2010
Jon Peterson Neustar 2009 2013
Bernard Aboba Microsoft 2010 2014
Ross Callon Juniper 2010 2014
Spencer Dawkins Huawei 2010 2013
Andrei Robachevsky RIPE / ISOC 2010 2012
Hannes Tschofenig Nokia Siemens Networks 2010 2014
Alissa Cooper Center for Democracy and Technology 2011 2014
Joel Halpern Ericsson 2011 present (*)
David Kessens Nokia Seimens Networks 2011 2013
Jari Arkko Ericsson 2012 2013
Marc Blanchet Viagenie 2012 present (**)
Russ Housley Vigilsec 2013 present (*)
Eliot Lear Cisco 2013 present (*)
Xing Li Tsinghua University/CERNET Center 2013 present (*)
Andrew Sullivan Dyn, Inc 2013 present (*)
Erik Nordmark Cisco Systems 2013 present (***)
Mary Barnes 2014 present (**)
Ted Hardie Google 2014 present (**)
Joe Hildebrand Cisco 2014 present (**)
Brian Trammell ETH Zurich 2014 present (**)
      *  Term ends March 2015
      ** Term ends March 2016
      ***Term ends April 2016

 


IAB Chairs

Member Organization (at time of service) From To
Dave Clark MIT 1981 7/1989
Vint Cerf CNRI 7/1989 7/1991
Lyman Chapin Data General, BBN 7/1991 3/1993
Christian Huitema INRIA 3/1993 7/1995
Brian Carpenter IBM 7/1995 3/2000
John Klensin AT&T 3/2000 3/2002
Leslie Daigle Verisign, Cisco 3/2002 3/2007
Olaf Kolkman NLNetlabs 3/2007 3/2011
Bernard Aboba Microsoft 3/2011 3/2013
Russ Housley Vigilsec 3/2013 present

 


IAB Ex-Officio and Liaison Members

IETF Chair (Full Member, with a couple exceptions)

From To
Mike Corrigan (*) 1986 1987
Phill Gross (*) 1988 1993
Paul Mockapetris 1994 1995
Fred Baker 1996 2000
Harald Alvestrand 2001 2005
Brian Carpenter 2005 2007
Russ Housley 2007 2013
Jari Arkko 2013 present

(*) Note: Prior to 1993, the IETF chair was appointed by the IAB and served on the IAB as a regular member.

IRTF Chair (Ex-Officio)

From To
Dave Clark (*) 1989 3/1992
Jon Postel (*) 3/1992 2/1995
Abel Weinrib 2/1995 9/1999
Erik Huizer 9/1999 12/2001
Vern Paxson 12/2001 3/2005
Aaron Falk 3/2005 3/2011
Lars Eggert 3/2011 present

(*) Note: Prior to 1993, the IRTF chair was appointed by the IAB and served on the IAB as a regular member.

RFC Editor Liaison

From To
Jon Postel 1998
Joyce Reynolds 1999 2006
Sandy Ginoza 2006 2010
Glenn Kowack 2010 2011
Olaf Kolkman 2011 2012
Heather Flanagan 2012 present

ISOC Liaison

From To
Larry Landweber 1995 1996
Don Heath 1996 2000
Lynn St Amour 2000 2011
Mat Ford 2011 present

IESG Liaison to the IAB

From To
Bob Hinden 6/1993 3/1994
Allison Mankin 7/1995 3/1997
Keith Moore 8/1997 3/2000
Randy Bush 3/2000 8/2001
Erik Nordmark 8/2001 5/2003
Bert Wijnen 5/2003 3/2006
Ted Hardie 3/2006 6/2006
Dan Romascanu 6/2006 3/2007
Mark Townsley 3/2007 7/2008
Lars Eggert 7/2008 7/2009
Ron Bonica 7/2009 3/2011
Sean Turner 2/2011 3/2012
Robert Sparks 3/2012 3/2013
Barry Leiba 3/2013 3/2014
Alissa Cooper 3/2014 present

Executive Director (Ex-Officio)

From To
Bob Braden 1983 1994
Abel Weinrib 1994 3/2001
Leslie Daigle (*) 3/2001 3/2002
Geoff Huston (*) 3/2002 3/2005
Rich Draves 4/2005 3/2006
Phil Roberts 4/2006 4/2007
Joe Abley 4/2007 3/2008
Dow Street 3/2008 3/2012
Mary Barnes 3/2012 3/2014

(*) Serving IAB Member and Executive Director.



IAB Liaison to the IESG

Two IAB members serve as liaison to the IESG, namely the IAB chair (ex-officio) and another designated members. The designated liaisons have been:

Member From To
Lyman Chapin 7/1991 3/1993
Christian Huitema 3/1993 5/1993
Yakov Rekhter 5/1993 3/1996
Robert Elz 3/1996 4/1998
John Klensin 4/1998 8/1998
Charlie Perkins 8/1998 3/1999
Steve Deering (backup) 8/1998 3/1999
Ned Freed 3/1999 3/2000
Steve Bellovin 4/2000 3/2002
Rob Austein 3/2002 3/2005
David Meyer 3/2005 3/2007
Loa Andersson 3/2007 3/2009
Dave Oran 3/2009 3/2010
Danny McPherson 3/2010 9/2010
Hannes Tschofenig 9/2010 9/2011
Joel Halpern 9/2011 3/2014
Mary Barnes 3/2014 present

Links

Sources

The information in this document was derived from: